Anthony R. Flores, MD, MPH, PhD

  • Associate Professor, Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, McGovern Medical School at UTHealth

Biography

Dr. Flores has several years’ experience in bacterial pathogenesis and pathogenomics.  He completed his MD, PhD (Microbiology), and MPH (Clinical Investigation/Epidemiology) at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.  He moved to Houston, TX in 2006 to begin his pediatric residency at Baylor College of Medicine and via the Accelerated Research Pathway completed his fellowship in infectious diseases at Baylor College of Medicine in 2012.  During his post-doctoral training, he was mentored by Dr. James M. Musser, a world-renown expert in bacterial pathogenesis and genomics, and focused on the bacterial genetic determinants of asymptomatic carriage of group A Streptococcus (GAS).  His research was funded by two prestigious awards through St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/Pediatric Infectious Disease Society and the Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.  Following fellowship, he became Assistant Professor in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Baylor College of Medicine and in 2017 joined UTHealth/McGovern Medical School as Associate Professor in Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

Education

B.S. Zoology/Physiology
University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming
Student, Molecular Biology
University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming
M.S. Microbiology
University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York
Ph.D. Microbiology
University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York
M.D.
University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York
M.P.H Epidemiology/Clinical Investigation
University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York
Residency, Pediatrics
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
Fellowship, Pediatric Infectious Diseases
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

Research Information

Dr. Flores’ research interests include investigative studies toward the mechanisms leading to asymptomatic carriage of the human pathogen group A Streptococcus.  His studies represent some of the few into the molecular mechanisms behind carriage in GAS and other bacterial pathogens. In addition to the innovative studies in GAS carriage and pathogenesis, Dr. Flores’ laboratory uses state-of-the-art sequencing technologies and comparative pathogenomics in an effort to better understand GAS diversity associated with specific disease states.